Native mammals enjoy the good times at Naree

Repost from the Bush Heritage blog:
 
As a Bush Heritage student scholarship researcher, I recently visited Naree and Yantabulla stations with volunteer Ofalia Ho to survey small marsupials in an effort to understand their food sources. Responding to the recent winter rainfall and the boom in food supplies were stripe-faced dunnarts, fat-tailed dunnarts and a kultarr.
 
a released dunnart found a hiding place up a nearby tree at Naree. Photo: Sue Akers
A released dunnart found a hiding place up a nearby tree at Naree. Photo: Sue Akers
 
The data we collected on this trip will be combined with that from insect and plant surveys to reconstruct the diet of these animals. This information will help us understand how they respond to increases in productivity, such as is occurring with the recent rain at Naree.
 
David Akers helping the research team take a hair sample for analysis. Photo: Sue Akers Ofalia and Justin taking measurements. Photo: Sue Akers
David Akers helping the research team take a hair sample for analysis, Ofalia and Justin taking measurements. Photos: Sue Akers
 
This field trip is part of a broader study I'm undertaking for my PhD, in which I'm looking at the boom and bust ecology of the ephemeral wetlands here at Naree and on neighbouring properties. 
 
Stripe faced dunnart deciding which way to go. Photo: Ofalia Ho
Stripe faced dunnart deciding which way to go. Photo: Ofalia Ho
 
Sue Akers, Bush Heritage's co-reserve manager at Naree Station says:
 "It's exciting that this is the largest number of small mammals found in our pit fall trapping to date, and the first Kultarr we have seen in the four years Bush Heritage has been in this part of the world. We really have had a wonderful winter and spring season."
 
Stripe faced dunnart release. Photo: Ofalia Ho
Stripe faced dunnart release. Photo: Ofalia Ho
Project: 
Managing for biodiversity in boom and bust cycle environments
Go to top