Chantelle Doyle

Chantelle Doyle

PhD candidate
Field of Research
Translocation, Threatened Flora, Conservation, Communication
Body

Plant conservation; A future on the move

Have you ever wondered what happens to a threatened plant when it stands in the way of a proposed road or development? What about when it is endangered or critically endangered and the number of known populations keeps shrinking? Increasingly conservationists, government and ecological consultants utilise in-situ conservation via translocation, the movement of plants, or reproductive parts to bolster or establish new populations. My research focuses on how this is done, why it is done and what are some of the best methods for translocating the Critically Endangered Hibbertia spanantha Toelken & A.F.Robz

 

Supervisors:

 

Publications:

Doyle C, Pellow, B., Hood M., Rapmund R. (2019) Case study: Threatened plant translocation Hibbertia spanantha Toelken & A.F.Rob (Julian’s Hibbertia), Dilleniaceae ANPC Translocation Guidelines Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation 28 (1)

Doyle, C., & Pellow, B. (2018) 'Thesium australe': Hardly there or simply hard to find? Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation, 27(2), 9.

Doyle, C., Macris, C., & Freemanis, A. (2013). Restoring reserves in the heart of Western Sydney: habitat reconstruction for the threatened Scarlet Robin. Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation, 22(2), 14.

  

Phone
+61 418 264 128
Email
chantelle.doyle@student.unsw.edu.au