Sharon Ryall

Sharon Ryall

Sharon Ryall
Manager, Centre for Ecosystem Science
Room 508, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences
UNSW Australia
Sydney NSW 2052
(61) 2 9385 2802

Publications

Author Date Title Link PDF
Lyons et al. 2018 Bird interactions with drones, from individuals to large colonies

Abstract

Drones are rapidly becoming a key part of the toolkit for a range of scientific disciplines, as well as a range of management and commercial applications. This presents challenges in the context of how drone use might impact on nearby wildlife, especially birds as they might share the airspace. This paper presents observations (from 97 flight hours) and offers preliminary guidance for drone-monitoring exercises and future research to develop guidelines for safe and effective monitoring with drones. Our study sites spanned a range of arid, semi-arid, dunefield, floodplain, wetland, woodland, forest, coastal heath and urban environments in south-eastern and central Australia. They included a nesting colony of >200 000 Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis, the largest drone-based bird-monitoring exercise to date. We particularly focused on behavioural changes towards drones during the breeding season, interactions with raptors, and effects on birds nesting in large colonies—three areas yet to be explored in published literature. Some aggressive behaviour was encountered from solitary breeding birds, but several large breeding bird colonies were surveyed without such issues. With multi-rotor drones, we observed no incidents that posed a threat to birds, but one raptor attacked and took down a fixed-wing drone. In addition to providing observations of interactions with specific bird species, we detail our procedures for flight planning, safe flying and avoidance of birds, and highlight the need for more research into bird– drone interactions, most notably with respect to territorial breeding birds, safety around large raptors, and the effects of drones on the behaviour of birds in large breeding colonies.

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Callaghan et al. 2018 A comment on the limitations of UAVS in wildlife research - the example of colonial nesting waterbirds View PDF
Callaghan et al. 2017 A probable Australian White Ibis Threskiornis moluccus × Straw-necked Ibis T. spinicollis hybrid

Abstract. We observed a probable juvenile Australian White Ibis Threskiornis moluccus × Straw-necked Ibis T. spinicollis hybrid on the Lachlan River catchment, New South Wales, in November 2016. Photographs, combined with observations, demonstrate phenotypic characteristics of both these ibis species. The bird had a pattern on the wing similar to the Australian White Ibis but coloration on the body similar to the Straw-necked Ibis. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of a probable hybrid between these two species in the wild, and the first report documented with photographs.

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Brandis et al 2014 Assessing the use of camera traps to measure reproductive success in Straw-necked Ibis breeding colonies

Summary. Nest monitoring may influence reproductive success and rates of predation. This study compared data from two methods of monitoring nests — repeated visits to nests by investigators and collection of data by camera traps — in Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis breeding colonies in the Murrumbidgee catchment in New South Wales. There was no significant difference in reproductive success between nests monitored by these two methods. These data show that (1) nest monitoring using camera traps is a valid survey method that reduces the need for investigators to engage in intensive and costly monitoring in the field, and (2) there was no detectable interference from repeated visits to nests by investigators on the reproductive success of ibis.

Brandis et al. 2012 Pittwater waterbird habitat survey and mapping - report View PDF
Brandis et al. 2011 Lowbidgee 2010/2011 Colonial Waterbird Breeding View PDF
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